“…people will often try and convince you to do something by saying that it doesn’t matter if you’re not the type, or that you could be the type if you wanted to be, but don’t break down and try to do something that you’re not the type to do, because you know what type you are, nobody else does.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“Sometimes people let the same problem make them miserable for years when they could just say, “So what.” That’s one of my favourite things to say. “So what.””

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“They always say that time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“…I think that just being alive is so much work at something you don’t always want to do. Being born is like being kidnapped. And then sold into slavery. People are working every minute. The machinery is always going. Even when you sleep.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“I can never get over when you’re on the beach how beautiful the sand looks and the water washes it away and straightens it up and the trees and the grass all look great. I think having land and not ruining it is the most beautiful art that anybody could ever want to own.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“Weight isn’t important the way the magazines make you think it is. I know a girl who just looks at her face in the medicine cabinet mirror and never looks below her shoulders…she just sees a beautiful face and therefore she think’s she a beauty. And therefore I think she’s a beauty, too, because I usually accept people on the basis of their self-images, because their self-images have more to do with the way they think than their objective-images do. Maybe she’s six hundred pounds, who knows. If she doesn’t care, I don’t.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“I believe in low lights and trick mirrors. A person is entitled to the lighting they need.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“People should fall in love with their eyes closed. Just close your eyes. Don’t look.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“I tried and tried when I was younger to learn something about love, and since it wasn’t taught in school I turned to the movies for some clues about what love is and what to do about it. In those days you did learn something about some kind of love from the movies, but it was nothing you could apply with any reasonable results.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“I don’t see anything wrong with being alone. It feels great to me. People make such a big thing about personal love. It doesn’t have to be such a big thing.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“During the 60s, I think, people forgot what emotions were supposed to be. And I don’t think they’ve ever remembered. I think that once you see emotions from a certain angle you can never think of them as real again. That’s what more or less happened to me.
I don’t really know if I was ever capable of love, but after the 60s I never thought in terms of “love” again.
However, I became what you might call fascinated by certain people. One person in the 60s fascinated me more than anybody I had ever known. And the fascination I experienced was probably very close to a certain kind of love.”

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Andy Warhol

“A sound ethical approach to food will ask: what difference does it make, if I eat this food? How do my food choices affect myself and others? It’s not wrong, in answering that question, to give some weight to your own interests and even to your own convenience, as long as you don’t do it to a degree that outweighs the major interests of others affected by your choices. You can be ethical without being fanatical.”

The Ethics of What We Eat, Peter Singer & Jim Mason

“What factory farms do to animals, nearby residents, and the entire planet’s environment, they do because people are accustomed to eating these animal products and can’t imagine a meal without them, or because they like the way they taste. These are not ethical justifications, given the harm these practices cause.”

The Ethics of What We Eat, Peter Singer & Jim Mason

“Our willingness to exploit non-human animals is not something that is based on sound moral distinctions. It is a sign of ‘specieism’, a prejudice that survives because it is convenient for the dominant group, in this case not whites or males, but humans.”

The Ethics of What We Eat, Peter Singer & Jim Mason

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